Exceed the Expectations of Others

Are you making an effort to exceed the expectations of your associates and customers, or are you just doing what you need to do to get by?

Q1 + Q2 + MA = C
Q1 is the quality of service rendered
Q2 is the quantity of service rendered
MA is the mental attitude with which it is rendered
C is your compensation
~ Napoleon Hill

Are you making an effort to exceed the expectations of your associates and customers, or are you just doing what you need to do to get by?

One piece of advice about surpassing the competition, whether you are an employee in the workplace or are an owner of your own business, is about exceeding the expectations of others. Some term it “going the extra mile.”  But regardless of the terminology, it can help make you indispensable.

Compensation includes not only money, but joy, harmony with others, a sense of tolerance, and anything else worthwhile one is seeking. People who exceed others’ expectations are a joy to be around. And, for the organizations where they work, they may be the greatest asset. These are my favorite examples:

Making an indelible impression.

Several years ago there was a young lady who worked at a coffee shop who consistently impressed her customers with her work ethic, enthusiasm, remembering their names, and providing outstanding service. The president of a major corporation called an employee recruiting agency that did work for his company. He said, “I don’t care where you place her in our company, but this is the type of person we need here.” The young lady began working at a significant pay increase a week later.

Anticipating every need.

One of the GLBR professionals who consistently exceeds others’ expectations is Annie Rummel, PhD, president of the Great Lakes Bay Regional Convention & Visitor’s Bureau. It’s not uncommon to ask her for something and have her drive over and hand deliver it within 24 hours—when most people would send it in the mail when they got around to it. Watching her and her staff host 70 championship soccer teams, their coaches, and referees from 14 states in 2012 would have amazed even the best hospitality professionals. They anticipated every need and defused every problem. Numerous officials said they had never seen such professionalism.

Doing her personal best.

A young secretary with little experience began working at a major GLBR medical center in 1977. It was a period of volatility within the organization, and she thought about leaving shortly after she arrived. Her father told her to do her absolute best and exceed everyone’s expectations. That’s exactly what she did, often working nights and weekends. Today, 37 years later, Peggy Lark is still the very successful executive assistant to the president of that same institution.

Giving their all.

The automobile dealership where I buy my cars and take them to be serviced exceeds my expectations. Regardless of what needs to be done to the car—even if it’s just an oil change under warranty—they wash the car, vacuum the inside, and Armor All® the tires.

Winning me over.

My favorite barbecue establishment exceeds my expectations by giving me free samples with some frequency. Several times they’ve dropped an apple cobbler loaf into my sack for free when I had a dinner order. The fact it’s the best apple cobbler I’ve ever eaten isn’t as important as their generosity in going the extra distance to please me. They’ve won me for life.

As Napoleon Hill states in his classic bestseller, Keys to Success: The 17 Principles of Personal Achievement, “People who need your work have things to offer you. You probably are not the only person capable of providing what they need. What will distinguish you from the crowd? The attention you generate by doing more than you are being paid to do.”

To comment on this article or share your own observations, or to schedule a presentation, contact Terence Moore at 989-430-2335 or tfm43@speednetllc.com.

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