Benefits of Society

Experts say people who socialize have happier, healthier lives

By Rich Adams   What’s not to love about February? Spring is around the corner, sunlight sticks around longer, and our thoughts and hearts turn to love. Humans are, by nature, social animals. But what are the health benefits – both physical and mental – to mingling with others? Socialization is often how we meet our future soulmate – virtually or in person. What are the compelling reasons we get married? And if our relationships start to unravel, how do we mend that gap in our hearts? Love has been described in many ways –  an answer, a battlefield, a many splendored thing, friendship caught on fire. Let’s look at the various types of love that enlighten our lives. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word “social” as “involving allies or confederates; marked by or passed in pleasant companionship with friends or associates.” Being social can bring pleasure and improve our mental and physical health. Socialization can help us live longer, more meaningful lives. But what exactly is “being social?” Can you gain benefits from social media in a virtual community? Does age matter when it comes to socializing? According to LiveStrong.com, older adults who live a social life can avoid many of the emotional, cognitive and physical difficulties encountered by isolated seniors. They live longer, healthier and more meaningful lives than senior citizens who keep to themselves. Health benefits because of socializing also pertain to younger people. Psychologist Susan Pinker said person-to-person interaction triggers a release of neurotransmitters that reduce stress and anxiety. Medical News Today studied the benefits of socialization and reported additional benefits. The touch of a romantic partner can help relieve physical pain. And people undergoing chemotherapy for cancer can gain mental and physical strength if they have access to social support and interaction. Even virtual socialization has advantages, according to bangthetable.com. Over time, online contacts can develop into a supporting, stimulating community.   How We Meet Two 2017 surveys came up with different results regarding how couples meet. A Knot Jewelry & Engagement Study showed 19 percent met through dating apps/social media, while 17 percent met through friends, 15 percent in college and 12 percent at work. A 2017 ReportLinker survey revealed 39 percent met through friends, 15 percent at work, 12 percent in bars, 9 percent at public events and 8 percent via dating apps. Or love could literally be in the air. Are you planning a trip soon? There is a very, very slight chance you could meet your soulmate while 30,000 feet up. According to an HSBC survey, which asked more than 5,000 travelers across the globe about their flight experiences and the onboard connections they’ve made, one in every 50 travelers has met the love of their life on a plane. That’s two couples that meet on every average U.S. flight.

Experts say people who socialize have happier, healthier lives

By Rich Adams

 

What’s not to love about February? Spring is around the corner, sunlight sticks around longer, and our thoughts and hearts turn to love.

Humans are, by nature, social animals. But what are the health benefits – both physical and mental – to mingling with others? Socialization is often how we meet our future soulmate – virtually or in person. What are the compelling reasons we get married? And if our relationships start to unravel, how do we mend that gap in our hearts?

Love has been described in many ways –  an answer, a battlefield, a many splendored thing, friendship caught on fire. Let’s look at the various types of love that enlighten our lives.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word “social” as “involving allies or confederates; marked by or passed in pleasant companionship with friends or associates.”

Being social can bring pleasure and improve our mental and physical health. Socialization can help us live longer, more meaningful lives.

But what exactly is “being social?” Can you gain benefits from social media in a virtual community? Does age matter when it comes to socializing?

According to LiveStrong.com, older adults who live a social life can avoid many of the emotional, cognitive and physical difficulties encountered by isolated seniors. They live longer, healthier and more meaningful lives than senior citizens who keep to themselves.

Health benefits because of socializing also pertain to younger people. Psychologist Susan Pinker said person-to-person interaction triggers a release of neurotransmitters that reduce stress and anxiety.

Medical News Today studied the benefits of socialization and reported additional benefits. The touch of a romantic partner can help relieve physical pain. And people undergoing chemotherapy for cancer can gain mental and physical strength if they have access to social support and interaction.

Even virtual socialization has advantages, according to bangthetable.com. Over time, online contacts can develop into a supporting, stimulating community.

 

How We Meet

Two 2017 surveys came up with different results regarding how couples meet.

A Knot Jewelry & Engagement Study showed 19 percent met through dating apps/social media, while 17 percent met through friends, 15 percent in college and 12 percent at work.

A 2017 ReportLinker survey revealed 39 percent met through friends, 15 percent at work, 12 percent in bars, 9 percent at public events and 8 percent via dating apps.

Or love could literally be in the air.

Are you planning a trip soon? There is a very, very slight chance you could meet your soulmate while 30,000 feet up.

According to an HSBC survey, which asked more than 5,000 travelers across the globe about their flight experiences and the onboard connections they’ve made, one in every 50 travelers has met the love of their life on a plane. That’s two couples that meet on every average U.S. flight.

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