Social Too Soon

What Age is Right For Social Media

By Adam Lansdell Once upon a time, a parent’s most stressful coming-of-age decisions revolved around how late kids were allowed to be out after dark or at what age they might be old enough to go out on a date unchaperoned, but in 2018 things are a bit more difficult. Raising children can be a guessing game and in some cases there simply aren’t answers etched in stone. One such question that parents are seeking an answer for: When do I let my child engage with social media? Knowing when to allow your child to enter the realm of social media isn’t black and white. As a parent it’s important to take into consideration the general suitability of the content your child might see on any given social media platform in relation to your child’s level of maturity. How will your child respond? Do you trust them not to engage with strangers? Each platform differs in its ability to censor sensitive materials. It’s important to discuss social media with your child and to lay some ground rules. According to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, it’s illegal for commercial websites and apps to allow children under age 13 to open an online account without verifiable parental consent. Ultimately, it’s up to individuals to decide if their child is ready to enter the digital social space, but many encourage parents to place each unique child’s safety at the heart of any decision. Turn it Off Before You Turn Down Cellphones, gaming systems and other gadgets are keeping the sandman at bay. Fixating on a screen in the late evening means consuming more of what is known as blue light. Naturally emitted by most modern screens, blue light can lead to irritation of the eye, headaches and the inability to relax, which makes it harder to fall asleep. Help your child sleep better by turning off electronics an hour before bedtime. ____________________________________________________________________   More Than a Feeling Understanding Your Child’s Relationship with Anxiety Mental health is being taken more seriously than ever, not only for adults but children and teens as well. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety and depression are treatable, but 80 percent of kids with a diagnosable anxiety disorder are not receiving any form of treatment. There are many ways to pinpoint if your child is experiencing symptoms commonly associated with an anxiety disorder. Here are some signs to look for from Anxiety.org:
  • Agitation
  • Restlessness
  • Inattention, poor focus
  • Somatic symptoms like headaches or stomachaches
  • Avoidance
  • Crying
  • Refusing to go to school
  • Meltdowns after school about homework
  • Difficulties with transitions within school, and between school and an activity/sport
  • Difficulty settling down for bed
  • Having high expectations for schoolwork, homework and sports performance
Children typically aren’t as familiar with their emotions or are unaware of irregularities, thus it’s important to observe your child’s behavior and ask questions to better understand what they’re experiencing. Empathy can be key, so be diligent about creating a better understanding of a child’s unique relationship with anxiety.

What Age is Right For Social Media

By Adam Lansdell

Once upon a time, a parent’s most stressful coming-of-age decisions revolved around how late kids were allowed to be out after dark or at what age they might be old enough to go out on a date unchaperoned, but in 2018 things are a bit more difficult.

Raising children can be a guessing game and in some cases there simply aren’t answers etched in stone. One such question that parents are seeking an answer for: When do I let my child engage with social media?

Knowing when to allow your child to enter the realm of social media isn’t black and white. As a parent it’s important to take into consideration the general suitability of the content your child might see on any given social media platform in relation to your child’s level of maturity. How will your child respond? Do you trust them not to engage with strangers? Each platform differs in its ability to censor sensitive materials. It’s important to discuss social media with your child and to lay some ground rules. According to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, it’s illegal for commercial websites and apps to allow children under age 13 to open an online account without verifiable parental consent. Ultimately, it’s up to individuals to decide if their child is ready to enter the digital social space, but many encourage parents to place each unique child’s safety at the heart of any decision.

Turn it Off Before You Turn Down

Cellphones, gaming systems and other gadgets are keeping the sandman at bay. Fixating on a screen in the late evening means consuming more of what is known as blue light. Naturally emitted by most modern screens, blue light can lead to irritation of the eye, headaches and the inability to relax, which makes it harder to fall asleep. Help your child sleep better by turning off electronics an hour before bedtime.

____________________________________________________________________

 

More Than a Feeling
Understanding Your Child’s Relationship with Anxiety

Mental health is being taken more seriously than ever, not only for adults but children and teens as well. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety and depression are treatable, but 80 percent of kids with a diagnosable anxiety disorder are not receiving any form of treatment.

There are many ways to pinpoint if your child is experiencing symptoms commonly associated with an anxiety disorder. Here are some signs to look for from Anxiety.org:

  • Agitation
  • Restlessness
  • Inattention, poor focus
  • Somatic symptoms like headaches or stomachaches
  • Avoidance
  • Crying
  • Refusing to go to school
  • Meltdowns after school about homework
  • Difficulties with transitions within school, and between school and an activity/sport
  • Difficulty settling down for bed
  • Having high expectations for schoolwork, homework and sports performance

Children typically aren’t as familiar with their emotions or are unaware of irregularities, thus it’s important to observe your child’s behavior and ask questions to better understand what they’re experiencing. Empathy can be key, so be diligent about creating a better understanding of a child’s unique relationship with anxiety.

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